THE LANGUAGE OF TAM'NÝER—A'

C'eröd is the universal language of Tam'nýer—a', The knowledge and understanding of C'ërod was gifted to every sentient being by the God of Language: Sùrelï.

C'eröd is strongly influenced by Icelandic, Romanian and Portuguese. With some additional influence from French, Spanish, as well as a pinch of Latin, Greek, German, and Thai.

RULES OF C'ËROD

  • When ' appears after any vowel it is pronounced as 'ugh'
     

  • Y's are strictly considered vowels in C'ërod, unlike English which constitutes Y as being both a vowel as well as a consonant.
     

  • Indicators of a notation of time (of any kind) are symbolized by a ' followed by its appropriate increment word. For instance, days are marked by 'sk after the number of said day, e.g., Zjn'sk (1st day)
     

  • No name in C'eröd begins with the letter J. It is deemed inauspicious due to Jn. Not even a flora or fauna bears a name beginning with J.

 

1. However, the gemstone Jaq'-bû, does in fact begin with one. However, this may be because it is poisonous to the touch and toxic to most. Sorry, J.

2. Note that this rule of proper names not beginning with the letter J due to Jn does not apply to the Ṅkhya'jra. This is because, as they are fanatic believers in all the Gods, Goddesses and their children. To shun one is to shun all.

 

  • Words, particularly names of natural resources and places, that end with "de" are pronounced as 'gee', e.g., Muntade (moon-ta-gee)
     

  • Whenever there is a sound or a spelling of a word that has two S's side by side, instead of being written out as "ss" the letter "ß" should be used. However, this does not need to be followed if it is a name.
     

  • The word "the" is implied with every noun. Consequently, there isn't a proper word for "the" in C'ërod.
     

  • In order to make something plural in C'ërod such as 'oranges' you would add çi to the end of the word, e.g., Ƒ'trüq means 'god' but Ƒ'trüqçi means 'gods'
     

  • Some words in C'ërod have 'ts' in them which is pronounced as 'su' like in 'suicide'
     

  • Ţ is pronounced as 'tz'. Think about putting your tongue against the back of your teeth when clenched and clicking your tongue.
     

  • Ł is pronounced as a 'w' sound, like in the English word 'will'. In addition to this, it is important to note that Ł only gets used when using the Conditional tense and never any other time.
     

  • Ž is pronounced as a 'juh' sound.
     

  • A pertinent thing to note of C'ërod, in particular to do with Jn, is that because his body makes up the land, some words used to describe the landscape are also the same word associated to a body part, despite the continents already being named after various body parts as well. The best example of this is the word for "mountain" is also the same for "knee": Enktî.
     

  • Concerning body parts, when it comes to describing a body part in the context of "my body part", the word "my" will be attached to the part described by a hyphen to denote the extension of self.
     

  • There is a trick of changing a noun into a verb. This is done in English by adding the suffix 'ing' to a noun, e.g., lust > lusting. In C'ërod, there is a similar idea executed by adding Þ to the end of a noun. In some regions, thanks to old teachings passed down by older generations, the is replaced by ð, so technically these two are interchangeable. Think of it as the difference between British English & American English; American English has discontinued 'u' in certain words, e.g. colour > color

ORTHOGRAPHY RULES

  • C'eröd is read top to bottom, left to right
     

  • Consonants create the 'body' of every word.
     

  • All consonants of a word must be written attached to one another.
     

  • The first vowel of a word is to be placed on the left hand side of the first consonant. Afterwards, the remaining vowels are to be placed on the right hand side of the consonants. This helps indicate where a new word begins and ends.
     

  • Vowels should be placed next to their corresponding consonants.
     

  • The first vowel of every word should be placed slightly higher than the second one, even if corresponding to the same consonant.
     

  • Apostrophes in words are marked with a check mark where applicable.
     

  • Dashes in words are marked with a circle where applicable.

 


You can see these written rules in place in this pictured example. This reads "Püertagœ". As you can see, the 'body' of the word is made by the consonants; P R T G

The first vowel ü is placed to the left of the word, signifying clearly that it is indeed the first vowel of the word. All others are placed on the right, next to their corresponding consonants, with œ sticking to the tail end of g.

imageedit_1_5125946275.png

TENSES


The most pertinent thing about C'ërod to keep in mind, other than its orthography & many vowels, would have to be its Tenses. In C'ërod there are 4 tenses in total:
 

  • Past

  • Present

  • Future

  • Conditional


To go over them, Past is, of course, used when referring to anything that has already happened. Present is during current time. Future is when referring to anything that is going to happen, and Conditional is a tense used when referring to future events that may happen. Think of Conditional as a tense for hypothetical speech or writing.

When it comes to tenses, it more or less affects only verbs, which means nouns say as 'I' or in C'ërod, 'Rey' stay the same.

TENSES CONTINUED:

Past:
To change a verb and indicate something that has occurred in the past, using the same example as above, Ōþe' changes into Ōþe'tāl. Using it as above, 'I am' turns into 'I was' with the new tense;

I was in C'ërod is Rey Ōþe'tāl.


 

Present:
In the same sense that nouns remain unaltered, so do verbs in the present tense. For instance;

I am in C'ërod (which we use the verb 'be' for) is Rey Ōþe'.

Rey means 'I' and Ōþe' means 'be' or, in this case, 'am'.


Future:
To change a verb and indicate something that will occur gets a bit more complicated as verbs

that start with vowels will begin with a 'Ž' but also end with 'de', which it will do good to remember,

sounds like 'gee' in C'ërod. Meaning that Ōþe changes Žōþe'de. Using it as above, 'I am' or 'I was'

turns into 'I will be' with the new tense;

I will be in C'ërod is Rey Žōþe'de.

However, for verbs that begin with a consonant, let's use 'Spread' which is 'Ðaim' in C'ërod, the 'Ž'

is dropped, but will still end with 'de'. So using Ðaim, this is how it should look when put into future

tense:

I will spread in C'ërod is Rey Ðaimde.

Though there are some verbs that already end with 'de' and here's where it gets trickiest because

what if you have a verb that starts with a consonant and ends with 'de'? Simple! The verb merely

begins with the first vowel in the word. To give an example we'll use the verb 'wash' which in

C'ërod is mobde;

I will wash in C'ërod is Rey Omobde.

The reason for this is that it not only keeps the rule simple but the verb already is considered

technically in future tense as it naturally ends with 'de'. In fact, with verbs like Mobde (wash) it is more common to mistake them as being used in future tense when in actuality as being used in present tense.

 

Conditional:
To change a verb to the Conditional tense, which means anything that is spoken or referred to as hypothetical, the rules take from the Future tense with its own twist. To better explain, the part borrowed from Future tense is that verbs will always have the first vowel of the word repeated even if the word already starts with a vowel.

If the verb does indeed begin with a vowel and it then used in the Conditional tense, the vowel will merely be held for longer, e.g., An 'a' sound will be spoken as an 'aah' sound instead. Here is an example of how it would be seen written out;

I might burn in C'ërod is Rey Yyidzë.

However, the catch to this is that while the first vowel of the verb will be repeated is that every verb used in Conditional tense will start by Ł, and this is the only time that this consonant is used in C'ërod. Ł is strictly for conditional tense use.

With that in mind, let's take a look at what the completed version of Yidzë (burn) would be in conditional;

I might burn in C'ërod would be Rey Łyyidzë.

For verbs, like the aforementioned Mobde, would transform like this;

I might wash in C'ërod is Rey Łomobde.

See how the first vowel is repeated, and still begins with 'Ł'? That's a dead giveaway that the verb is in the conditional tense.

imageedit_3_5423353687.png

Rey Žōþe'de
in C'ërod Orthography

TITLES & NOUNS

NOUNS

  • When ' appears after any vowel it is pronounced as 'ugh'
     

  • Y's are strictly considered vowels in C'ërod, unlike English which constitutes Y as being both a vowel as well as a consonant.
     

  • Indicators of a notation of time (of any kind) are symbolized by a ' followed by its appropriate increment word. For instance, days are marked by 'sk after the number of said day, e.g., Zjn'sk (1st day)
     

  • No name in C'eröd begins with the letter J. It is deemed inauspicious due to Jn. Not even a flora or fauna bears a name beginning with J.

 

1. However, the gemstone Jaq'-bû, does in fact begin with one. However, this may be because it is poisonous to the touch and toxic to most. Sorry, J.

2. Note that this rule of proper names not beginning with the letter J due to Jn does not apply to the Ṅkhya'jra. This is because, as they are fanatic believers in all the Gods, Goddesses and their children. To shun one is to shun all.

 

  • Words, particularly names of natural resources and places, that end with "de" are pronounced as 'gee', e.g., Muntade (moon-ta-gee)
     

  • Whenever there is a sound or a spelling of a word that has two S's side by side, instead of being written out as "ss" the letter "ß" should be used. However, this does not need to be followed if it is a name.
     

  • The word "the" is implied with every noun. Consequently, there isn't a proper word for "the" in C'ërod.
     

  • In order to make something plural in C'ërod such as 'oranges' you would add çi to the end of the word, e.g., Ƒ'trüq means 'god' but Ƒ'trüqçi means 'gods'
     

  • Some words in C'ërod have 'ts' in them which is pronounced as 'su' like in 'suicide'
     

  • Ţ is pronounced as 'tz'. Think about putting your tongue against the back of your teeth when clenched and clicking your tongue.
     

  • Ł is pronounced as a 'w' sound, like in the English word 'will'. In addition to this, it is important to note that Ł only gets used when using the Conditional tense and never any other time.
     

  • Ž is pronounced as a 'juh' sound.
     

  • A pertinent thing to note of C'ërod, in particular to do with Jn, is that because his body makes up the land, some words used to describe the landscape are also the same word associated to a body part, despite the continents already being named after various body parts as well. The best example of this is the word for "mountain" is also the same for "knee": Enktî.
     

  • Concerning body parts, when it comes to describing a body part in the context of "my body part", the word "my" will be attached to the part described by a hyphen to denote the extension of self.
     

  • There is a trick of changing a noun into a verb. This is done in English by adding the suffix 'ing' to a noun, e.g., lust > lusting. In C'ërod, there is a similar idea executed by adding Þ to the end of a noun. In some regions, thanks to old teachings passed down by older generations, the is replaced by ð, so technically these two are interchangeable. Think of it as the difference between British English & American English; American English has discontinued 'u' in certain words, e.g. colour > color

GENDER NOUNS

  • Ţur
    'woman', 'female'

     

  • Chynó 
    'man', 'male'

     

  • Nāx 
    'ambiguous gender', 'undetermined gender'

HONORIFIC NOUNS

For all of these below, please remember to add surnames after the title. Calling someone solely ‘mister’ or ‘miss’ is actually quite rude if you know their name. It comes off rather condescending. If, however, you are making their acquaintance for the first time, it is much more acceptable, but of course, this is subjective.

  • Taityl
    Title for an unmarried woman. Think ‘Miss’

  • Tolla
    Title for a married woman. Think 'Mrs.'

     

  • Eit'rtîr
    Title for an unmarried man. Think 'Mr.'

  • Ethor
    Title for a married man. Think 'Mr.'


     

  • Khah'Xia
    Title used strictly for the current ruler of the Sky-Coral Sea

    • When spoken Khah'Xia is Khah'Xia, that’s it, as the Khah'Xia surrenders their individualistic name once appointed.

  • Starosta
    Title used for the Heads of the 12 Greater Families of Püertagœ

    • To denote the differences between the other Starostas, Starosta should always be followed by their Family name. e.g., Starosta Cámünda

  • Agridar
    Solely used for retired Heads of the Family of Püertagœ

    • The same as Starosta. e.g., Agridar Zûtran

FAMILIAL TITLES

  • Yoivda
    Human term for ‘Mother’

     

  • Yógra
    Human term for ‘Father’

     

  • Pavska
    Human term for ‘Brother’

     

  • Zavia
    Human term for ‘Sister’

  • Iña'mè
    An Ãoni term for ‘Mother’

     

  • Iño’mă
    An Ãoni term for ‘Father’

     

  • Kigră
    An Ãoni term for ‘Sister’

     

  • Kigrè
    An Ãoni term for ‘Brother’

LANDSCAPE & BODY

COLOURS

  • Nöxœ ; White
     

  • Wînq'äşf ; Black
     

  • C'rras ; Purple

  • Styño ; Red

  • Ƒractû ; Green
     

  • Brakß ; Blue

  • Vīdzë ; Orange
     

  • ​Laachum ; Body

 

*Laachum is C'ërod for 'body' or 'physical self'. However, Laachum also means 'disease'. The reasoning for this is due to the fact that while words that are parts of the body double as pieces of the landscape (as you will see here), and the land masses that make up Tam'nýer-a''s continents is made up of the disgraced god: Jn.

  • Nue ; Face | Moon

    • (Goddess of the Moon & Companionship)

  • Enktî ; Knee | Mountain
     

  • Enktîgrœs ; Hand | Hill

  • Chkèrill ; Hair | Waterfall
     

  • Ţxyăkas ; Bosom | Cloud

    • (Can be used as 'Heart' or 'Chest' as well)

EXCLAMATIONS & CURSES

  • Brin'ry ;
    A rather light exclamation of dissatisfaction or disbelief. Think of it as an exasperated 'oh my god' without the religious connotation.

     

  • Tilaut ;
    An acceptable swear word in all manners of society except for when attending formal affairs. Tilaut translates to something between our 'damn' and a stern 'shit'. An exclamation of frustration to help relieve the stress of a situation.

     

  • Vakás ;
    Vakás is a bit harsher than the aforementioned Tilaut in the way that it is always uttered when one is done with a situation and either on the precipice of being livid or has crossed that line already. It is a curt and rather rude way of saying 'enough!', almost like our 'shut the fuck up'.

     

  • Hadrat ;
    Hadrat is curt and cutting. You want to stop a room? Shout "Hadrat!". The closest one can explain it is like our earthly 'fuck!' but it does not conjure up the same feeling of profanity. In fact, "Hadrat" is probably the black tie version of 'fuck'. It is acceptable anywhere, except for perhaps in the company of the Khah'Xia on a diplomatic visit. But it is an exclamation of much displeasure, frustration, and anger. It can also be uttered when disciplining insubordination from a superior.

TURNS OF PHRASE

  • "That's rich like a Trótskarrien sands!"
     

  • "A Sk'älik's ass!" akin to 'my ass!' an expression of disbelief.
     

  • "About as useless as a monsoon in ZàÞça." because no matter what, it'll always be a desert.
     

  • "In the eye Ilăș, of course you would!" is uttered usually in an argument, playing upon the negative aspect of manipulation, and points out someone who has done a wrong and finds it perfectly all right.
     

  • "Going through my tapestry" can mean 2 distinct things;

    • Racking my brain

    • Thinking of the past
      The only thing that differentiates the two is the setting as well as the tone of voice.

  • "Nýer—a''s Light to you" is regarded as formal parting words.
     

  • "Without scrutiny” is a farewell saying that originated from the metropolis of Püertagœ meaning “I pray you are given the benefit of the doubt and the freedom to be without scrutiny”. Its popularity is spreading however thanks to the locals in their travels. It is catching on primarily in Fawzia-Kedet. Of course, this farewell is not considered formal.
     

  • "I'm in Nue's Arms" or "You must be in Nue's Arms" is a turn of phrase akin to "I'm over the moon" meaning that you are elated or exceptionally pleased with something.
     

  • "You're in the bosom of Tam'nýer-a'" is equivalent to "You've got your head in the clouds" but also can mean that you're lost in your dreams or emotions via daydreaming. This is due to the C'ërod word Ţxyăkas meaning both Bosom and Cloud(s) and the relation to the clouds being the dwelling place of the superstition The Docents of Dreaming; the Oðjo.

DICTIONARY

A - G of the English Language

  • Again (more): Aeg

  • Air: Bókßt 

  • And: Kal 

  • Androgynous: Nāx

  • Androgynous Lover: Nāxšir

  • Arrive: ßkrît

  • As: Maj 

  • Ash: Pèšt 

  • Attack: ßkrîtæ

  • Aware: ßrîte

  • Be (to be): Ōþe' 

  • Bed: Géede 

  • Bend: Enkt 

  • Black: Wînq'äşf

  • Bliss: Jjn'Ƒë 

  • Blow: Heoux

  • Blue: Brakß 

  • Boyfriend: Chyšir 

  • Burn: Yidzë 

  • Bury: Pumo

  • But: Twu 

  • Collect: Veraẞ 

  • Crystal: Makŭs 

  • Death: Uuvan 

  • Die: Mīggrăt 

  • Disease: Laachum

  • Dogma: Saksùvisţ 

  • Don't: Chîn

  • Escape: Ñaštæ

  • Fall: Chkèrî 

  • Field: Dūnga

  • Food: Përruq 

  • For: Ðoléţ 

  • Friend: Širrish

  • Girlfriend: Ţuršir

  • God: Ƒ'trüq 

  • Green: Ƒractû 

H - M of the English Language

  • Home: Östra

  • Honour: Sakneump 

  • I: Rey 

  • Instead (in place of): Mibdu 

  • Joint (to bend): Enkt 

  • Leave: Ñaš 

  • Live: Smărrj

  • Long: Sālle 

  • Lust: T'akž 

  • Man: Chynó 

  • May: Frãs 

  • Me: Zijan 

  • More (again): Aeg

  • Miracle: Mirailka 

  • Miss: Taityl 

  • Missus: Tolla

  • Mister (unmarried): Eit'rtîr 

  • Mister (married): Ethor 

  • My: Klœ

  • Mystery: Reðongá 

N - S of the English Language

  • Okay: Hen

  • Once: Ózjn

  • Orange: Vīdzë 

  • Our: Zigé 

  • Over: Dry-ñ 

  • Perfume(scent|odour): Skëzos 

  • Perhaps: Kăvanšæ 

  • Prey: Nāxñaš

  • Purple: C'rras 

  • Red: Styño 

  • Rise: Dry-ñ

  • Run (away): Ñašte'

  • Song: Fruila 

  • Spread: Ðaim 

  • Star-crossed: Bûsta-gr'tîš 

  • Strech: Sālge

  • Sun: Nýer

T - Z of the English Language

  • Tear: Vibûm

  • Then: Túl

  • Tradition: Altam'parā

  • Unaware: Ñašte 

  • Wash: Mobde

  • When: Wúl

  • White: Nöxœ

  • Who: Geoux

  • Wind: Bóßña 

  • With: ßokră

  • Woman (female): Ţur

  • Word: Sùreump

  • You: 

  • Your: